Pioneer and Legend Baumwolle Baumwolle
LOOKING BACK IN HISTORY - Seite 6
Biographie
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"Working Man Blues" was the featured title of my first longplay record, pressed yet in black vinyl, but the song was far away from any political working class content. I penned that number, that mistakingly became my most requested song at that time, in 1965. Fortunately, a scholar picked me from a private appearance and recorded a couple of my songs on semiprofessional equipment. This are among the first tapings, long before I happen to be put into studios for commercial recording.
"Working Man Blues" tells about my life as an outcast, who had been displaced to work in a factory and desperately looking for a girlfriend that could’nt be found due to my uncompromising attitude towards popular lifestyles. Regardless of the songs real content, I seemed to become popular anyway. Today, I think my popularity was simply based on some kind of alien-effect, cause everybody wanted to see that Elvis-styled anachronism, carrying out such fabulous country-blues guitar.
The following years were offering me a lot of opportunities, I never had before. Within a year, I came under management and my name was known all over the country. Even in some of the remotest villages of Austria, Al Cook posters could be found among local countrydance-bands of the period.
But Amadeo-Records wanted me to lean towards popular blues tastes, in order to brush up my style and needless to say, their sale-figures. In fact, they wanted me to team up with the british blues connection and contacted Alexis Korner to arrange some sessions with John Mayall and Eric Clapton, who was freelancing after "Cream" broke up at the close of the sixties.
My answer was as clear as sunrise: "No, not at all" . I just did not want my music to be drowned by tons of fuzz and wah-wah. At least, I was’nt fond of working with "long-haired drug addicts", as I used to call them.
From Clapton to Hendrix, they were great musicians, but had nothing to do with the stuff, I would file under blues. So I wiped off my last chance to make it probably on international stages.