Pioneer and Legend Baumwolle Baumwolle
LOOKING BACK IN HISTORY - Seite 2
Biographie
Seiten Index
Seite 1
Seite 2
Seite 3
Seite 4
Seite 5
Seite 6
Seite 7
Seite 8
Seite 9
All Pages

It was literally some long old lonesome day, when I came in touch with a neighbor, who lived next door. After we shook hands, he showed me a tape, containing some dixie-jazz and other similar stuff. But sandwiched between the tracks, I discovered music, that was completely unknown to me, but it went straight to my bones....it was the BLUES. That was the second time, my life made a change, but this time, my attitude to music was motivated by artistical means rather than entertainment. That was decidedly the perfect vehicle to tell my story. To become a passable blues guitarist, I taught myself the required basics by studying all the different styles by ear. Exploring the techniques of authentic Mississippi slide guitar, I quickly became an expert, although there have not been anybody to show me anything. When I came home from work, I took up my box and practiced until after midnight. When I got tired of playing, I laid down with earphones on my head, drumming the blues in my youthful ears, that were still used to the sounds of Elvis' golden records. Meanwhile, the music outside my little world changed again. The british blues boom was about to take over in Continental Europe and the cercle around it’s founder Alexis Korner was setting the pace. John Mayall and his protegee Eric Clapton with his sensational trio, called "Cream" were telling the audience, what to file under blues.
But again, I did not care...
My universe was the authentic blues culture, that grew giants from Blind Lemon Jefferson and Charley Patton to Lightning Hopkins and Robert Johnson and I was deeply convinced, that I had to carry out the legacy of their music and began to feel as to be "one of them". In fact I was lightyears away from being a real bluesman. I still stuck too much to the fifties and my image of the blues was’nt far from picturesque showboat-romantics. But "The Bluesmen", a book by Sam Charters helped me along, to know about the real thing.